Significant gains have been made this week in negotiations for the world’s biggest regional trade deal, and a conclusion definitely remains within reach, the Minister for Trade and Investment Andrew Robb said today.

“We all went to Hawaii with the aim of concluding and while we didn’t quite get there we are definitely on the cusp. Most importantly the resolve remains to get this done,” he said.

“While nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, I would say we have taken provisional decisions on more than 90 per cent of issues and during my involvement in TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement) negotiations this has been by far the most productive meeting at both ministerial and officials’ level.”

“The provisional decisions already taken would make this the biggest regional agreement in the world and the most significant agreement since the conclusion of the Uruguay round more than 20 years ago,” Mr Robb said.

“From Australia’s perspective we have made significant gains across every area, including agricultural market access. There are a handful of big outstanding issues that directly affect us as well some moving parts involving other countries in areas like automotives, data protection around biologics, dairy and also sugar. 

“There has been progress in all of these and from my reading the issues are not intractable and there remains a real determination to conclude the TPP among all parties,” he said.

Mr Robb said the TPP involved 12 countries which accounted for almost 40 per cent of GDP and presented an opportunity for truly transformational reform.

“The establishment of a set of common trade and investment rules across these 12 countries – with the prospect of others joining in the future – will have a most material affect in terms of lowering the cost of doing business.

“This in itself will support some quite profound economic benefits in terms of growth, job creation and higher living standards and that is on top of significant market access gains for our exports and services and a more conducive investment environment,” Mr Robb said. 

Australia is committed to concluding the negotiations and will continue working closely with TPP partners in advance of meeting again in the near future.

The 12 countries negotiating the TPP are Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, New Zealand, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam. Together they constitute around 40 percent of global GDP.

A third of all Australia’s exports of goods and services are to TPP countries and 45 per cent of the stock of Australian outwards investment. Negotiations began in 2010. 

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